Functional Training

Running trails in Mill Park

Trail Running in Mill Park

We are currently on a mission where my two running buddies and I are looking at tackling another Spartan race in September while building up to towards a full road marathon in late October.

As a group we have previously tackled sever running event as they pop up and deal with them as part of our regular running program. This time around we are being more practical and have planned out strategies to cover three different runs while ensuring that the workouts all complement each other. We have already completed the Plenty valley 11.2klm trail run as part of our preparation and have set up a solid base of  trail running for the next more challenging and longer event – The Spartan beast that is a half marathon trail run along with many obstacles.

It’s been an interesting few months as we have built up the necessary kilometres of running required to successfully complete this particular trifecta all while maintaining our health and staying injury free. We are all have other responsibilities and getting injured is not an option so we do our best to prepare for the upcoming events with a sound program that balance out running and resistance training.

Our running

The first race for us was the Salomon run in plenty valley (Mill Park) which is an 11.2 klm’s trail run around the blue lake single trails that is one of the more scenic events this series has to offer. It’s made up of several single track sections, a big hill and several more technical sections that add up to an enjoyable and challenging run. We have been running this particular area for several months as we are local to this course and change the route every time we run the park for variety. We generally cover anything from 8 to 20 klms depending on the type of workout.

With trail running just chucking in hill or two makes a huge difference so there’s plenty to offer here. This shorter (Salomon series) of the 3 events offers us the opportunity to work on our hill climbing , speed work and overall endurance in using it as a stepping stone to the longer and harder 20klm Spartan race coming up in September. Let’s not forget the Marathon in October.

The following is a simple, yet effective plan in getting you prepared for trial running. Remember, the bottom line with most programs is to simply turn up, do the work and commit to the long term plan. Especially with running!

  • 2-3 times minimum running 8-15 klm’s both on road and trails. This would include a longer run over the weekend covering a mix of road/trail up to 20klm’s
  • 2 sessions working on resistance training
  • And for my clients 1 personal training session working of full body strength covering specific requirements based on their particular needs.

Our weight training sessions

The resistance program was approached with a view of ensuring that the overall training load would fulfil an all over strength base increase and make us more durable given the trail running effect on the body and in particular preparation for the half marathon distance Spartan race. It’s basically a General Physical Preparation plan that will deliver a bigger return on workout time. It’s important to ensure that both you fitness and conditioning is up to the task.

The following represents the major exercises/movement covered.

Trap bar Deadlift/barbell

Barbell military press

Barbell bench

Barbell squat

Pull ups/chins

For a more conditioning approach the following more that satisfied the criteria

Kettlebell swing

Kettlebell push press

Sandbag shouldering / Sandbag muscle snatch

Battling rope

Skipping

My own weekly program was basic. Here’s the plan for the last month. 

Sunday – Long run

Monday – Mobility / weights

Tuesday – Run

Wednesday – Run

Thursday – Weights

Friday – Run

Saturday – Mobility

A lack of preparation will show on the day.

Similar to most things in life without proper planning you are going nowhere. It’s clearly the way to approach any fitness goal as it will go a long way in getting you where you want to be. whether its weight loss, an increase in fitness levels , becoming stronger or simply cleaning up your act with your food , it will always come down to having an effective plan first and then sticking to it. I’ve seen it many times before during running events where  a few chosen ones turn up and think they will wing it on the day and “see how it goes” unfortunately this usually doesn’t go too well. It’s the same thing with nutrition, if you don’t manage your intake along with the quality of your nutrients then nothing will happen.

By having a plan you at least have a greater chance in achieving your goals. As life tends to sometimes getting the way it’s always good to know that you can always adjust you plan as circumstances dictate. It’s better to have one than not.

Claudefit Personal training is located in Mill Park with the premises conveniently located with access directly to the gorge and its many trails.

Happy training and see you at Spartan. AROO!

 

Running Strength Program

Running Strength Program

Over the last 3 years I’ve been a fairly consistent runner and at the moment I’m having a good time running during our Melbourne winter months and will keep this up as part of my basis of keeping my bodyweight in check ,still staying strong and as a Personal trainer hold an expected level of fitness while staying injury free. Currently I’m running 40-60klm a week at 79kg.

So how do I keep myself reasonably strong, fit and unbroken with all the running I do? I’ll outline a typical week of training and hope this can help you out. You can adjust according to current fitness levels. The workout template for the winter period is going to be quite simple and will support my running base. Naturally this will be altered over time and most likely change post winter heading towards the warmer months where ill increase the volumes. So basically this is my running strength program.

Here’s a typical week of training. Please note mobility and flexibility Drills are done during workout.

Monday:

2xKettlebell Military press 5×5

2xKettlebell Cleans 5×5

2xKettlebells Squats 5×5

2xKettlebell Swings 5×10

2xKettlebell SLDL (works the Glutes directly)

Hanging knee raises 5x 10

5klm recovery run

Tuesday: 10 klm run

Wednesday: 10 klm run

Thursday:

Barbell Bench press 5×5

Barbell deadlift 5×5

2xKettlebell renegade rows

5klm recovery run

Friday:

10klm run with client (6:15am start)

Saturday – Free day of mobility drills with a light Kettlebell

The Turkish Get Ups are done with a kettlebell that will not put too much pressure on me while I move. So it depends on the day on how my body feels that will determine the weight used. Remember you need to use the right tool for the job and not always the “heavy one” The  Goblet a squats for me are quite strenuous at the beginning and end up feeling the best once I’ve warmed up and finished a few sets. You only need to do 3 reps per set at most, keep the hips open and stay in the bottom position and you are done. In finishing off with the single bell Kettlebell Swings it’s just a matter of complimenting the previous two exercises and during winter goes a long way in keeping you warm. Add in a foam roller and the above exercise and you most likely feel you might need a run. Most of the time it’s enough for me and don’t need to run. Only if I’ve for some reason I had to make up some klms I did get in during the week

Sunday – 20klm run with running buddy (6:15am start)

The long run is basically a great calorie burner and allows me to own a solid running base over the winter months. It also keeps me with a reasonable fitness base for the running events myself and clients do.

Naturally this is a base program and can be altered as time goes by, as I need to increase the running kilometres or add in a couple of well-paced 5klm runs for added strength.

The bottom line is that I’m kept strong, fresh and injury free and my bodyweight is in check.  Like most I Just need to keep an eye out on the food intake over winter!

The best part is I’m getting out there in the cold and having good time.

Happy running

www.claudefit.com.au

 

 

Tough Mudder preparation

Tough Mudder fun

So you think you are ready for the tough mudder experience do you? Well great. The first part about entering this great event is the decision to give it a try and work towards completing the challenging 20klm long course in tackling approximately 20 or so obstacles. It’s your decision.

At Claudefit we think the TM is a great way to work towards your all over fitness , weigh loss and is a great motivator once you and your team have put the money down and all have a clear focus on what’s coming up. It’s amazing how much ownership you take once you put a cost to it.

Out team here at Claude fit has now participated in 3 of these events and we are proud of the fact that in the second and third one we have always included newbie’s who have managed to complete it unscathed. No major injuries and a lot of fun had. I myself mostly enjoy the satisfied look of all my clients when they cross the finish line looking tired, covered in mud, soggy socks and a great individual story to tell.

So how do you prepare for Tough Mudder?

It’s pretty clear that in order to complete the TM you will need to have a solid running base that will get the job done. Now before you think that you can’t run 20klm think about the fact that you will be running from obstacle to obstacle and then stop (rest) negotiate the obstacle, wait for you team members and continue to run. As this is NOT a race the pace generally is kept by the slowest member of the group. TM encourages team work so don’t think that this is a fun run style set up where you are continuously running.

What you do need IMO is a solid minimum base of around 7-10 klm’s that will get the job done. Prior to the first TM I myself recorded my longest continual run at 11.5 klm. This was enough for me to get by. Now that I’m a regular runner the TM doesn’t really pose that much of a concern with distance. As the stop start nature of the event is great for recovery. So get running.

The obstacles are reasonable for anyone with an average base of fitness. Unlike other event you do not have to do all of them if you are intimidated or simply think they are out of your capabilities. It’s all right, just rest while the others in your team give it a go, then re-group and continue onto the next one. This is what TM is all about – Teamwork.

Without going over the entire obstacle that you will encounter (TM changes a few anyway) let’s go over the basic strength that you need to successfully cover the course.

  • You need to be able to pull your bodyweight up – whether it be climbing over the 3meter wall or getting over the rows of mud moulds, you need the strength and flexibility to get that leg over in making it through/over.
  • The ability to trudge through ankle deep mud for over 500 metres is also essential. Fit enough to do it and well balanced. Expect to fall on your butt and get covered in mud. Guaranteed.
  • A decent center of gravity is required and most of the obstacles require you to have good balance as part of the challenge. For example the balance beams are great. TM mudder also nails old tyres to logs that you have to walk around. Expect to get wet if you fall.
  • Have a decent sprint in your armoury. In order to get up to the top of Everest you need to have a bit of get up and go and sprint full on towards the ramp. (Think skateboard ¼ pipe here) Many don’t quite make it even when a helping hand is waiting to meet you half way. This one was frustration to the ladies in out group.  A few sprints in your training will certainly help out.
  • Hanging strength. The monkey bars are a bit of a novelty during TM. It’s one of the more well know obstacles where the set up allows for many rows of bars to keep everyone moving along. Basic holding strength and knowing how to move come in handy. At Claudefit the pull up is a as staple here so the holding strength should pose no problem. However with all things related to TM, you will have tired and slippery hands by the time you get to this obstacle. In the past we cop it around the 18klm mark.

The event is quite achievable for most as it attracts people of all shapes and sizes and is a well run safe event. It’s really suited t all types. You only need to want to give it a go.

One of my clients didn’t quite get by all the obstacles , however was thrilled that his body was able to at least take part and surprise himself with what he did. That what is t all about

Participating, challenging you and having a hell of a time.

See you in the mud.

 

Go here for my Obstacle course Page

Spartan race preparation

Spartan is a race

I’ve been fortunate enough to participate in two of these unique evens in both the 14klm Spartan Super and now recently completed the 7klm Spartan Sprint. Both are catered to the same crowd and quite smartly linked together as a package to ultimately be called the ultimate Spartan. There is another longer 20klm + race that I’m yet to partake in appropriately called the Spartan Beast.

In addition I’ve run my own personal training team/groups over 3 tough mudder’s and have incurred more mud and  bruises on my body now that in my whole weigh training experience.

In order to properly prepare for these events one thing is clear. First and foremost this is a running event. Yes it’s referred to as an obstacle course for some. But be under no illusion. You have to run. And since it’s called a race. You have to run at pace.

Similar to a fun run you are provided with a race bib and more importantly a timing chip. That’s right. you will find out how you fared pretty much straight away, as on crossing the finish line you collect your participant medal, you free t-shirt, a beer (if you want one at 9am in the morning) and then check you race time.  This is a great way to establish who is superior with you mates and makes it fair to those who were starting out on a different wave time.

Quite competitive for some and a lot of fun for all.

Spartan preparation

So how do I get ready for this event I hear you ask? Number one in my opinion is to have a plan of what you are going to do and stick to it. You need to know what lies ahead and not just turn up on the day and have a crack! It’s all experience. You can even hire a trainer who has done it before and can get you  to the starting line ready to go , fit, strong and knowing what’s coming up.

Number one on the hit list is Running. You need to be able to run on uneven terrain, across cow paddocks (no cows at event) up dry creeks, down slippery slopes and generally anything that the great Australian bush throws at you. The only assistance you get is a marker leading you to the net obstacle.

Here’s a few of the obstacles I encountered and the suggested required preparation, the 5 are only my own most memorable obstacles you will be challenged to negotiate and get by. Should you choose not to try or unfortunately fail. You will be penalised 30 burpees. So either get accustomed in performing this wicked little exercise or do the right thing and get prepared. Either way, you are going to get it. (Insert evil laugh here)

 

  • Deadlifting the 55kg Deadball and walk – pretty much self explanatory , you get to the Deadball which is basically a flat plastic ball filled with 55kg for men folk and 35kg for the Spartan ladies. You pick it up and then have to carry it for distance and place it back to where you found it. Simple, not easy. This is where your Deadlift strength and bottom position of the squat comes into play.
  • The Sandbag carry – Again the weight of the equipment is 20-25 kg’s for the men and I believe 1o kg for the ladies. On my last Spartan event we had to carry the sandbag uphill around the tree on top of hill and return it back. On my second Spartan, we actually had to carry it down hill first and then back up. Same but different I reckon. Still the same effect. Add running to and from this obstacles and you start to appreciate what just happened. Learn how to shoulder a sandbag , work on shoulder stability and work your core.
  • Wall climb – This for me was simply out of the question, with a height of 174 cm and a bodyweight of 79kg and been old. I just dont have the get up and go to get my hand over the 2m+ wall from a run up – I wish! Solution. Quickly find a new buddy and ask for help. Don’t forget to offer hand in helping them, once the obstacles is complete run as you have paid the price and earned the right to continue alone. The wall climb basically required pulling strength and a bit of flexibility work to get the leg over. If you are no longer a spring chicken tread carefully as this is one of the common injuries in getting over the wall. A lack of hip & inner thigh flexibility.
  • Traversing the rope / rope climb – yeah I know I’ve put two items under rope. It’s because once you get accustomed to handling your bodyweight in the rope climb it stands to reason why you wouldn’t want to traverse along the rope from one end to another. ( it’s just fun)It was a safe obstacle during the sprint as the possible fall was only about 9 feet and you landed on an oversized pillow. Think jumping castle floor here! For some this one’s quite hard as from what I saw with a first timers and would be Spartans. Quite humbling when you don’t know how to move. The other rope option is the always troublesome rope climb. Never underestimate the power to pull yourself up. With and adequate level of pulling power and solid grip strength up you go it would seem. Remember once again you will most likely be running prior to tackling an obstacle so you will be tired, wet, have slippery hands and then need to get to the top to ring the bell to make it legit. (And pose for photo) The crowd that gathers here is always willing to provide you with a ready made cheer squad! We cover this in my facility in always having the rope handy for you to play with. So by the time you hit it at the event. It’s all been done before. So plan ahead.
  • Horizontal wall traverse – This one’s is my favourite as my kids have called It the ninja walk (as seen on ninja warrior program) it requires a great level of grip strength, great co ordination, solid core strength. With an understanding of having at least a basics 3 point contact at all times you can certainly negotiate this one well. Should you be carrying a little more girth than others that pushes you away from the wall, have poor coordination and really never worked you grip strength. I suggest you work on burpess.

The little wooden block that you both stand and hold on to is about 5-10 inches long and about 1-1/2 inched wid. Again watch out for slippery hands and shoes. How we train this at Clausefit is simple. Get you grip strength up and slowly transfer the weight onto the fingers. Along with rope pull ups should do the trick. The rest is just about being naturally co ordinate. Helps to be lean.  

Other obstacles to mention were the Balance Beams, Swimming the dam, Kettlebell on a rope, Spear throw, Tire pull on rope, Concrete block drag and the famous last one ,the Fire jump.

By now two things should be obvious. You are either fired up to give it a go yourself, or you have pulled your head back into its shell and retreated.  It’s this type of event.

Perhaps a friendlier fun run is in order for now. A long as you move you will do well. But don’t give up.

At Claudefit personal training the obstacle events like Spartan and tough Mudder are what some clients use to keep them motivated in reaching their goals. So if you are interested let us know. We are always keen to get others involved in joining the fun.

Go here for my Obstacle course event page.

Go here for my Conditioning options page.

My favourite 5 core movements, for now.

As a Personal Trainer I’m always asked what the best core exercises to do. I’m quite sure that if you are researching for core movements on the web you will be inundated with more than enough exercises to fill your next year or so with every variation possible in getting that midsection sorted out. Because we all know you want super looking abs for summer! So for those who in addition follow a strict nutritional regime the results will be that ever elusive 6 pack. For me at the moment the 6 pack AKA as beach abs isn’t whats going to get the job done. I need strong and resilient core strength first in order to be able to carry out my daily activities in being a Personal trainer. The summer abs usually are lightly (whatever that means) packed away for now with a still lean, healthy and happy body. I’ll leave the schreding for those who feel the need to look under fed all year round.

Ok let’s move on, here are my favourite core movements that I see as my go to. Yes these are my own that I like and use often within my own programming. This is not to be confused with the core work I provide my personal training clients. My clients needs alter due to fitness, movement, possible hindrances and injury. Hope you can make them a favourite for you.

Torsinator

This attachment to me is awesome. It’s a movement that you are activation the core work while standing up. As most life and sporting endeavours are carried on standing up it makes sense to work the core standings. For those who otherwise perform a sport on the floor (example BJJ or wrestling) the carry over effect is well complimented by the real time you spend on the mat and do your thing.

My own Little Torsonator attachment works wonders and develops my rotational core strength. The movement is generated from the legs and works you through the torso. This is the sort of strength and conditioning you get that transfers over well and can be applied to many sports. For me it’s just a simple and d effective movement in getting the job done. Best of all I’m getting my core in upright.

Turkish get ups

First up this exercise/movement totally rocks. It basically all you need if you only had one exercise to do and minimum equipment. (Preferably a kettlebell ) The TGU stands alone in working the entire body through its initial complicated sequence of movements from the ground to a full standing position. As an RKC2 instructors the TGU is one of the primary moves taught and are tested on, and effectively applied to my clients for either a movement screen , Cardio, strength and for some a solid conditioning workout. It all depends on the bell used the objectives and hopefully for you proper instruction. Once you start working the “heavy one” you will soon realise that the core gets a consistent workout over the sequence and is of great benefits.  It’s why the TGU is one of my favourites. Make it yours.

Hanging Leg raises

It’s only been recently that I’ve even bothers to attempt these little nuggets. You see I didn’t even rate them. Perhaps I was too busy being strong or something. It was only during my RKC2 cert that I realised I couldn’t even bring my legs up to the bar and lower with any strength let alone control. I learned a lesson that day. Since then I took on the progression starting with hanging knee rises and took it from there. Now I’m able to rep out and lower with more control and dignity than before. A worthy skill to have as a trainer and especially if you are going to demonstrate it to people you wants to perform same task. My abs generally gets a little tender when I push this movement. (That’s a good thing, right?) It’s also helped in my overhead arm position due to volumes, and is a constant stretch. No overhead positioning problems for me.

Renegade rows

I was introduced to these a while back in viewing Mike Mahler on you tube. It’s basically holding onto two kettlebells ( yes kettlebells do a better job) in a traditional push up position and then shifting you bodyweight over to one side and pulling up to the side of the torso with the other. A simplistic explanation that works better with proper instruction. Rushing into this one can be problematic as you have two protruding metal handles to face plant if you get it wrong. Refer a Kettlebell instructor for this if unsure. The learning of the renegade rows allow for the full body to work in a combined effort to allow for the shifting of the bodyweight and the pulling motion of weight. Overtime when you are more efficient and handle a greater load It then becomes obvious how hard the midsection id getting a hammering. Learn, practice and then go for it.

Abb wheel

The Abdominal Wheel is a classic. Along with the Torsinator, it delivers a genuine abdominal workout that addresses your whole mid-section, not just the beach muscles.

This little devil reminds me of the late night infomercials back in the late 80 where the very muscled and lean bloke would do countless reps while showing off his impressive torso. I can only imagine how many of these little suckers where bought up and them after that one workout – yeah the one we did for 3 hours and then never touched the bloody thing it again! For those who want the full technical explanation on what muscles.

Here’s what part of the spill is on Ironedge’s web site mentions;

“A functionally strong core, which means greater balance, stability and spinal health, requires that you learn to brace the whole mid section. This requires the synergistic contraction of the rectus abdominals, internal and external obliques, transverse abdominus, multifidus, quadratus lumborum, sphincter and diaphragm.”

I just call it a devilish little wheel that lets you know what muscles you have worked properly. Give it a try and see for yourself. No cheating.

So there you have it my favourites (for now) At Claudefit Personal training I normally work on the basis of full body strength, mobility and fitness and take it from there depending on objectives. Can’t really go wrong with General physical preparation for most individuals so anything specific will be addressed for core if required.

Keeping a strong core/midsection is critical for health and strength benefits. In particular as you get older and need this important strength.

PCC – Its time to hit the bar

Having recently completed The Progressive Calisthenics (PCC) course that was hosted by Read Performance Training and successfully passing the requirements of the “Century test” I now have a new fondness and respect for all things bodyweight.

It was obvious to me from the start that I would have my work cut out in managing to “ace” all the moves being taught. You see I’m a lifter and like to lift what I still in my own mind think is heavy stuff. (It’s a macho thing!) however this “stuff” as I put it was rarely bodyweight. And boy was I in for an enjoyable surprise. When it was initially promoted from approximately 6 months prior, I immediately jumped on, paid my registration and then though here we go again, time to get it done and earn another worthwhile certification.

Hang on, I’ve never really been heavily into Bodyweight training so what do I do now? What have I done? Have I gotten ambition mixed up with ability, again?

Well this had to change, and given that I previously dropped my own bodyweight down from a solid 92kg frame to a now leaner and much more comfortable 78kg (due to my focus now being on running plus a desire to be more of a complete trainer) it wasn’t long before I was playing around with my own bodyweight preparing for PCC. Fortunately I have in my possession the two convict conditioning books along with a reasonable library of other resources that allowed me to plan accordingly and help me meet the criteria on the day.

After all I am a trainer and work with people so you would expect me be organized I guess. So here goes.

My programming was designed around the following basic movements. In no particular order, here was my template of the main moves that I at least has control over. Please note these were not all performed on the same day.

  • All the stretches I knew!!!
  • Chins ups & push up variations.
  • Pistol squats.
  • Hanging leg raises, now my go to abs exercise.
  • Running. Well it is bodyweight!
  • Bridge holds
  • Prone hold ( reminded me of group classes)
  • Handstand /play holds and Handstand pushups.
  • Bodyweight Dips on Gymnastics rings
  • And my trusty 10kg weight vest.

Let me spell it right out. It was mostly 90% working on a basic 5×5 based strength protocol for all the movements when practicing. The benefit of this for me was that I had applied it to Barbell (naturally), Kettlebells and now given my fondness of it to bodyweight training. Sometimes it even got to the stage of a simple 3×3 depending on how “fried” my body felt from the previous overloaded workout the day before – a rookie mistake that I made often due to my stubbornness. It’s a different kind of hurt when the nervous system is depleted! Take my word.

The only major difference to this was on the days I felt ok and decided to put more volume into it. For example a 15 x 5 set on the chins up. (Clearly I like chin ups) It’s the one movement that petrifies the newbie’s and was the base test entry going into the RKC cert. So I out of fear I already had the “money in the bank “ In relation to pull ups and now actually enjoyed them.

Unfortunately these volumes did not transfer well to other exercises. Like any well balanced program, we all can’t do what we like. So play it smart. Take for example the hanging leg raise series found in convict conditioning. There is a clear process to follow in getting though the recommended progression and I must admit that I cheated and moved on and jumped a few steps ( keep this quiet please) then eventually  common sense prevailed and went back to start.

With my new enthusiasm and weigh drop I was eventually well on the way in working toward my plan on passing the PCC.

Yes I like to plan, so my first stop was asking myself. What did it take to pass? How long do I have? Then work backward from there. You have to pass the century which is as follows for men conducted at the end of the 3 (long) days after all the work had been done!

1. FULL SQUATS:                        40 reps

2. FULL PUSH-UPS:                    30 reps

3. HANGING KNEE RAISES:         20 reps

4. FULL PULL-UPS:                    10 reps

TOTAL:    100 reps

At first this for me was a reasonable request and gave it a go and sort of completed it and thought to myself “yeah not bad” it should be right. This was another rookie mistake as it was obvious later on when I increased the volume during my workout that I would have 3 days of bodyweight hands on training and had to finish the test within 8 minutes with no stops and strict form or else! Oh and I knew the instructors (all of them), so no hand outs where ever going to be given. “So much for mate’s rates”

Fortunately for me this was a great wake up call and as I like to believe prepared myself accordingly with a solid base of general physical preparation. (GPP)  In other words I turned up ready to be taught and was physically conditioned to at least perform the basic exercises, learn and not get hurt due to a lack of conditioning. It costs money to attend these courses and it’s a total waste for all if you turn up unprepared.

The movements that are taught are many, just to name a few. Push ups and variations, chins and variations, front levers, back levers, pistols and floor holds to name a few – let’s not forget the muscle ups .

Check the website for a more comprehensive description on the PCC

http://www.dragondoor.com/workshop/

This inaugural Bodyweight course was held at Read Performance, Australia’s Dragoondoor arm run by Andrew Read and along with top flight PCC instructors Al Kavadlo & Danny Kavadlo and the rest of the team facilitated a well run and enjoyable experience from start to end. To say there was energy in the room is an understatement. It was booming!

As usual I take a casual approach to these workshops. I like to have fun and absorb the knowledge given out and as I know these guys are not going to hand it to you just by turning up like many other certs I make a point of getting myself adequately prepared and ready by cert time. No excuses.

You have to earn it, so be warned!

It was clearly one of the more enjoyable workshops that I have done and along with the incredible manual the information I now have access too, will keep me busy and clients challenged for a long time to come.

Now off to the bar for some much needed practice and remember to have always have fun.

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